The Beginner’s Guide to RV Travel: 5 Essential Tips You Must Know

The Beginner’s Guide to RV Travel: 5 Essential Tips You Must Know

The Beginner’s Guide to RV Travel

Do you want to go on the ultimate RV trip this summer but it’s your first time RVing? Take a look at these essential RV travel tips that every first-timer should know.

Have you heard the news? RV’s are back, front and center in the hearts of the American population.

There were 15% more sales of RVs in the last year alone, and with sales steadily rising since the 2009 financial meltdown, the popularity of RVs has never been better.

Whether you’re young or old, traveling in an RV has something to offer, especially if it’s your first RV road trip.

With newcomers to RV travel in mind, here are 5 tips that you shouldn’t set off without knowing.

1. Don’t Overload Your RV

Before you set off on your RV trip, you need to check the maximum weight your vehicle can hold. Overloading your RV is an easy mistake for RV newbies to make, but it can be costly.

Crashing your RV while it’s overloaded will invalidate your insurance, so it could leave you out of pocket. If nothing else, it puts a heavy strain on your RV and could be illegal.

If you run into trouble, don’t worry. Check out the RV servicing solutions we offer for RV owners needing urgent RV repairs.

2. Share the Driving

Next on our list of tips for first-time RVers is designed to help you cope with long journeys. Driving can be exhausting, so if you’re driving with a partner, look to share the driving between you.

Training up a second driver is also a good idea if you find yourself injured and unable to complete your journey for any reason.

If you’ve never driven an RV before, check out these tips on how to handle and drive one.

3. Prepare for Wi-fi Not-Spots

We’re living in a digital world, and if you’re keen to share your holiday snaps with friends and family back home, you’re going to need internet wherever you go.

Lots of RV parks and public areas may come with public wi-fi access, but it isn’t guaranteed. Thankfully, you can prepare for wi-fi ‘not-spots’ pretty easily.

Pick up a mobile Wireless hotspot device that can connect to the internet over a cell phone network. This will give you internet wherever you go, although you’ll still need a good signal from your cell network for this to work. Be sure to check your current mobile device, many of them come with a hotspot option, which means your phone can easily become a wi-fi hotspot as long as your carrier has coverage where you plan to travel.

4. Never Forget Your Essentials

If you’re going RVing, don’t forget the essentials before you set off.

A basic first-aid kit is probably a good idea, packed with bandages and disinfectant at a minimum. We also think you’re going to need some wind-up torches and lamps (you won’t always have electricity to charge batteries).

There’s a whole lot of other essentials you could add to this list, so here’s an RV checklist you can use to be sure you’ve packed everything you need.

5. Be Spontaneous, but Not Careless

RV life is fun, and most of all, it gives you the chance to be spontaneous. New RVers can find this a tough adjustment, but it’s part of the fun.

If you find yourself at a location you enjoy, stay there a week or two longer. You’re in an RV, so the world is your oyster to explore!

That said, things don’t always go to plan, even when you don’t have a plan. Travel with a budget in mind, keep a full tank of gas, and have plenty of food and water to keep you going.

If you need to find a campsite to stay at, GoCampingAmerica can help you find a park in every state.

Enjoy the Fun and Avoid the Pitfalls of RV Travel

If you’re looking for freedom, RV travel offers that in spades. Your RV is your gateway to a life of fun and exploration on the road, but a little planning will help you avoid some of the more obvious pitfalls.

RV life isn’t for everyone, but if you’re looking for an exciting and low-cost way to travel, investing in an RV could be the best decision you make for your family.

Looking to buy an RV, or just to rent? Either way, why not contact us and discover whether our RV sales or rental options are right for your needs.

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Thor Chateau 28Z Motorhome Review

Thor Chateau 28Z Motorhome Review

Our family took out the Thor Chateau 28Z recently.  This was our first trip in a Chateau, and it was noticeably smaller than the Forest River 3011DS (29ft 11 inches versus 32 ft 3 inches in the 3011DS).  However, even with about a yard difference in length, we had ample room for our family of four.  The Chateau is designed to sleep 7, but that may depend on the size of your travelers.

Reviewing the sleeping lay out, let’s start with the dinette that converts to a sleeping space.  Our 9 yr old son had no problem sleeping in the space, but it might be tight if your kids are a bit older or larger.  However, the bunk over cab area is quite spacious and does not disappoint.  Plus, the sofa across from the dinette converts to a queen.  Therefore, if your family has a few teen-age kids, there is ample room for at least 2 in the bunk over the cab, 2 on the queen sleeper, and one on the dinette (2 if they are small!).  Including two more adults sleeping in the bedroom this Class C will easily sleep 7.

A couple of other positives worth noting: there are plenty of seat belts for travelers to choose between when riding in the cabin of the RV.  The dinette had two seatbelts and the sofa had three, so passengers have good seating choices when riding along. We also liked that the ladder for the bunk over cab could stay down while my son slept in the dinette area. This made it easy for the bunk sleeper to get down and visit the restroom at night, or get a drink from the kitchen, etc.  There were plenty of plugs for our electronics in the Chateau as well.

This was also our first time going to an area that had no campsites available.  Due to the lack of camp parking & the influx of travelers, we chose to stay in a Walmart parking lot overnight.  The Chateau had plenty of privacy blinds and finding a place to park was not an issue at all.  My husband had called ahead to ask (just to be safe!) and the manager on duty suggested that we part around the side, so we did.  The only surprise we had was in the morning when I walked out – there was a Class A parked in the next aisle over.

To summarize, we found the Chateau very comfy.  The few ‘cons’ that we noticed were the turning radius (my husband commented on this while navigating the 2 lane county roads we took to avoid I-65), the lack of stabilizers to help it rock a bit less while parked, and the smaller restroom (as compared to the Forest River 3011DS with the shower on one side and the lavatory on the other).

The Thor Chateau has a few key ‘pros’ that make it an excellent choice for those that want a Class C under 30 feet long.  First, it has a very efficient floor plan that allows for good movement throughout the RV.  Second, it sleeps 7 very easily.  Third, it has an abundance of windows – so for those that like to see outside from their bed, there are windows by every sleeping area (3 in the bedroom!) that make for excellent views from almost every space.

For a smaller Class C with plenty of sleeping areas, the Thor Chateau is worth checking out.

P.S.  This content was originally shared in our “From the Road” newsletter, so if you enjoyed this post- please sign up to get our newsletters in the future!

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